Meet the judges

Craig Potton photographer

Craig Potton

Craig Potton is New Zealand’s best-known landscape photographer and an ardent conservationist.

In 2013, he received the Insignia of a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to photography and conservation over the past 35 years.

For more than three decades he has documented the New Zealand wilderness, exploring relationships between the concept of artistic beauty and wilderness in the natural world.

Craig’s recent work also includes film and television. He was the Location/Stills Photographer on The Lord of the Rings, Peter Pan and The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe motion pictures.

Craig lives in Nelson where he runs a contemporary art gallery.

Find out more about Craig Potton at craigpottongallery.co.nz

Rachael Rakena

Rachael Rakena is a New Zealand artist of Māori (Ngā Puhi and Ngāi Tahu) descent.

Rakena coined the term ‘Toi Rerehiko’ to centre, claim and name digital space within a Māori paradigm, she describes and locates Māori digital/video/electronic-based art practice in terms of continuum, motion, and collaboration.

Critiquing notions of fluid identity, Pacific understandings of space and water through metaphors of digital space as water space, inhabited by iwi Māori, her art installations have evolved to enculturate and politicize water itself, navigating issues of ongoing Pacific diaspora, flooding and rising sea levels, and decolonization/(re)vitalization.

Known for her collaborative practice, she has been exhibiting internationally for 20 years.

Rachael is a mum of one, a founding member of Paemanu, a collective of Ngāi Tahu contemporary artists, and a Senior Lecturer at Massey University Whiti o Rehua School of Art in Wellington.

Find out more about Rachael Rakena at digitalocean.manamoana.co.nz

Rachael Rakena
Rachael Rakena

Rachael Rakene

Rachael Rakena is a New Zealand artist of Māori (Ngā Puhi and Ngāi Tahu) descent.

Rakena coined the term ‘Toi Rerehiko’ to centre, claim and name digital space within a Māori paradigm, she describes and locates Māori digital/video/electronic-based art practice in terms of continuum, motion, and collaboration.

Critiquing notions of fluid identity, Pacific understandings of space and water through metaphors of digital space as water space, inhabited by iwi Māori, her art installations have evolved to enculturate and politicize water itself, navigating issues of ongoing Pacific diaspora, flooding and rising sea levels, and decolonization/(re)vitalization.

Known for her collaborative practice, she has been exhibiting internationally for 20 years.

Rachael is a mum of one, a founding member of Paemanu, a collective of Ngāi Tahu contemporary artists, and a Senior Lecturer at Massey University Whiti o Rehua School of Art in Wellington.

Find out more about Rachael Rakene at digitalocean.manamoana.co.nz

Faye Robinson

Fayne Robinson

(Judging Poutini Ngāi Tahu award)

Fayne Robinson is of Ngāti Māmoe, Ngāi Tahu, Ngati Apa ki te RĀ TŌ, and Ngāti Porou descent.

Born and raised in Hokitika, he graduated from the New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute, Rotorua, in 1984. He remained at the Institute for a further fours years as a graduate carver before returning to Te Tai Poutini as a tutor for two years in Hokitika.

With a desire to further his knowledge of Maori values, beliefs and the traditional forms of carving he returned to Rotorua.

Fayne has been involved in the carving of eight wharenui across the North and South Islands. The greatest honour of all was being asked to design and oversee the carvings for his two marae on Te Tai Poutini (Te Tauraka-waka-a-Maui marae in Mahitahi/Bruce Bay, and Arahura marae near Hokitika).

Over the years, Fayne has exhibited his artworks and shared his knowledge throughout New Zealand and internationally.

Mahan Coulston

(Judging Poutini Ngāi Tahu award)

Mahan Coulston has been carving for eighteen years and is of Poutini and Ngāi Tahu descent.