Congratulations to our 2020 Winners

The 2020 winners have been selected by our judging panel to be the top  entries for this year in each category.  They have been photographed and are being displayed in our outdoor gallery in Weld Lane along with the other finalists.

Supreme Award winner:

sponsored by: Bill Blackadder Trust

Te Nehenehe Kahurangi (The Blue Forest)

Artist: Jennifer Katarina Rendall

About the artist.

Jennifer Rendall
MFA painting SFA, University of Canterbury 2010

Consideration to the wellbeing of our indigenous plants and the natural environment, and more recently, researching the naturalisation of New Zealand’s indigenous plants in other countries, as well as looking into naturalisation of European and other nation’s plants here in New Zealand, have been factors that have informed what I paint.
An important part of my practice and inspiration involves simply being outdoors and observing –
Walking or tramping trips are good for seeing native plants. Time spent in the natural world has greatly influenced and increased my respect for the land and forest ecosystems.

 

Artist Statement

For this painting, ‘Te Nehenehe Kahurangi ‘ The Blue forest’, I wanted to represent a range of our plants and trees and bush that are endangered, threatened or declining species, and also to show their beauty.
The found furnishing fabric with leaves was a suitable background for my painting of these New Zealand taonga species, consisting of two rakau rangatira above, including the Matai at top left, the two bushline endangered plants below, and at center, two of many endangered native Myosotis ( native NZ forget-me-nots) growing from the Southern Alps to the West coast. At top right is the kauri threatened by kauri die-back – and at the bottom the kowhai ngutu kaka, and the poroporo.
The podocarp Matai while not endangered is said to be in decline. On the coast there is one Matai tree said to be 1000 years old near Lake Ianthe ( Lake Matahi )

Highly Commended

Weta

Artist: Karyn Roberts

About the artist.

I’m a multi disciplinary artist based on the West Coast of New Zealand’s South Island. Pencil is my primary tool, which I use to create intricate drawings full of texture and detail.
I also work in charcoal, pastel and colour pencil. I’m currently experimenting with watercolours and oils. The human figure, fabric and the ocean are some of my favourite subjects. I like to encourage the viewer to take a closer look at the everyday with detailed drawings of an otherwise mundane slab of concrete, or close cropping of faces.
I also work with hard stone. My small sculptures and jewellery are crafted from stone I have found, collected or traded when I travel, and from home where I collect stone from the local beaches. I carve jade, sodalite, argillite (my favourite), beach pebbles, greywacke and many more. I studied hard stone carving at the Tai Poutini Polytechnic in Greymouth, NZ. That was around 2001 and I’ve been carving ever since.
You can see more of my work at karynrobertsart.com or on Instagram and Facebook at KarynRobertsArt

 

Highly Commended

Geologists Creek 1989

Artist: Ruth Mitchener

About the artist.

I initially studied Fine Arts at Whitecliffe in place of my final year at high school, but then moved on to studying Industrial Design. Having worked as a Designer, and had a family, I’m only now getting back into painting while the kids are at kindergarten. I started back painting again after 19 years as I felt that we didn’t have enough (or any) pictures of family on our walls, so I painted some, and it has snowballed from there. I am inspired by the Impressionists, and that representation of the natural world through colour and light.

 

Artist Statement

This piece is called Geologists Creek 1989, as it is painted from a photograph my late father took of me and my sisters playing in the creek 31 years ago. The painting is of just a small portion of the background of the image, and is painted very very small on the canvas, almost like you are viewing the image through a window, that you need to squint through to view; Like a far distant memory of a magical moment in your childhood. And being of such a small size, the brushstrokes of oil paint are clearly visible, making up the whole picture from a few juicy wet pixels.

 

 

Young Artist Award winner:

sponsored by: The West Coast Society of Arts

Inverting

Artist: Holly Schroder

About the artist.

My practice consists mainly of painting, sculpture and light installation. The painting works are often based around taking scenes and subjects from many different environments and merging them through movement patterns. Often movements catch my eye and turn into inspiration for multiple works. I like how there can be multiple stories playing out simultaneously in one work, and how each subject can be connected and interacting with the subject next to it. I want the experience of my work to be an unravelling process, you learn more and more over time as your perspective shifts.

I’ve been involved in a number of groups, solo exhibitions, and public installation works in Auckland and around New Zealand. I have a Bachelor of Visual Art from AUT and a Graduate Diploma in Creative Technology from the Media Design School. I grew up in Hokitika, on the West Coast of the South Island and now live and practice full time in Auckland.

 

Poutini Ngai Tahu Award winner:

sponsored by: Bill Blackadder Trust

Te Nehenehe Kahurangi (The Blue Forest)

Artist: Jennifer Katarina Rendall

About the artist.

Jennifer Rendall
MFA painting SFA, University of Canterbury 2010

Consideration to the wellbeing of our indigenous plants and the natural environment, and more recently, researching the naturalisation of New Zealand’s indigenous plants in other countries, as well as looking into naturalisation of European and other nation’s plants here in New Zealand, have been factors that have informed what I paint.
An important part of my practice and inspiration involves simply being outdoors and observing –
Walking or tramping trips are good for seeing native plants. Time spent in the natural world has greatly influenced and increased my respect for the land and forest ecosystems.

 

Artist Statement

For this painting, ‘Te Nehenehe Kahurangi ‘ The Blue forest’, I wanted to represent a range of our plants and trees and bush that are endangered, threatened or declining species, and also to show their beauty.
The found furnishing fabric with leaves was a suitable background for my painting of these New Zealand taonga species, consisting of two rakau rangatira above, including the Matai at top left, the two bushline endangered plants below, and at center, two of many endangered native Myosotis ( native NZ forget-me-nots) growing from the Southern Alps to the West coast. At top right is the kauri threatened by kauri die-back – and at the bottom the kowhai ngutu kaka, and the poroporo.
The podocarp Matai while not endangered is said to be in decline. On the coast there is one Matai tree said to be 1000 years old near Lake Ianthe ( Lake Matahi )

3d Form Award winner:

sponsored by: Fulton Hogan

Salacia

Artist: Mandy Gargiulo

About the artist.

Working exclusively with porcelain, Mandy Gargiulo draws inspiration from the shapes & textures of her natural surrounds. Flowers, leaves and the sea are all strong influences on her work. Celebrating what she terms the “ beautifully perfect imperfection of nature”, no two pieces of work she creates are identical. Mandy’s pieces all show the signs of the hand that made them and the personality and materiality of porcelain as a medium. Mandy’s pieces encapsulate and enhance the perfect imperfections of the natural world.
Supreme award recipient 2018 Ceramics NZ Expressive Ceramics Exhibition & finalist Rick Rudd Emerging Practitioner in Clay 2018, Portage Ceramic awards2019, UKU Hawke’s Bay Art Awards 2020.

 

Highly Commended

Ethereal

Artist: Anne Daniel

About the artist.

My weaving journey with harakeke (NZ flax) began about 20 years ago at a Westland High weekend class. Since then I have gradually morphed from a maths teacher into a fibre artist with a deep passion for harakeke – both natural and dyed – as well as other plant fibres. I create woven art works for the wall, sculptural objects, baskets and kete, many of which have found new homes all over the world. I grow most of the materials I use in my work. My home and studio in Kaniere are set in a large garden and native bush; these surroundings feed and inspire my creativity. Visitors are welcome by appointment.

 

Artist Statement

I am always looking at new ways of incorporating harakeke into my art work. This work is created from narrow strips looped and knotted in a technique taught to me by the late Tungia Baker. While I have made a few smaller works using the technique, this is the largest to date. It was created earlier in 2020 as part of a body of work with holes and curves for the Gold.Flax.Paper exhibition. The curve, a whiri/plait created from four whenu/strips woven around wire to keep its shape, allows the delicate golden work to float on the wall, creating interesting shadows. Images never do it full justice.

 

Yvonne Rust TAI POUTINI LANDSCAPE Award winner:

sponsored by: The Yvonne Rust West Coast Art Trust

Harakeke Nui

Artist: Allan Batt

About the artist.

Allan was raised on the West Coast of the South Island. He is an entirely self-taught artist painting large scale paintings on canvas using oil paints, applied in a meticulous fashion, layering thin glazes of colour to achieve a photo realistic effect.
Many of the plants subjects of his paintings are common to New Zealanders, but often overlooked as insignificant. Until these plants are magnified many times and painted, their true beauty becomes obvious.
Allan has a love of New Zealand’s natural environment, this has inspired recent new work from architectural flora in all it’s diversity and colour, to close up detail of rugged coastlines. He tries to capture a sense of tranquility and beauty in many of his paintings. In essence “natural unspoiled New Zealand”.
Allan has held may successful exhibitions throughout New Zealand and his paintings are sort after nationally and internationally.

 

Highly Commended

Forgotten Garden

Artist: Caroline McQuarrie

About the artist.

Caroline McQuarrie is an interdisciplinary artist whose primary interest is the concept of home, whether it is located in a domestic space, a community or the land we identify with. She works with photography, video and craft practices to explore meaning carried in photographic and craft based objects and domestic, suburban or community sites. Exploring the role of the feminine in everyday life, and investigating the capacity for the act of making to create agency in women’s lives, McQuarrie is concerned with how memory and sentiment is manifested in objects. Her work also explores how the photographic representation of a site with a particular history can reflect on the present. Caroline is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at Massey University, Wellington.

West Coast Expression Award winner:

sponsored by: Westland Arts Inc (WAI)

Wave 2020

Artist: Kate Buckley

About the artist.

Kate Buckley is interested in projects which link art, people, and place.
Now living in New Zealand, she is originally from Ireland.

Kate exhibits regularly and has spent time as Artist in Residence at the National Folk Theatre of Ireland (Siamsa Tíre), with ArtsLab Theatre company at Trinity College Dublin and at the Stamsund International Theatre Festival (Norway). She has work in the collections of the Irish president, Guinness (Ireland ) Ltd, the Wallace Collection (NZ) and many of the Irish Regional Councils’ art collections.

During 2020 she has exhibited in a three-person show at the Left Bank Gallery, was selected for Shared Lines: Pūtahitanga, now on exhibit at Cathedral Square, Christchurch and is part of the currently touring Artists’ Book Exhibition selected by Paul Thompson for PCANZ.

 

Highly Commended

The Whisper of Hooves

Artist: Maria Martin-Smith

About the artist.

I started weaving in 2018. I had undergone major medical challenges since 2016 and was looking for ways to help me recover both physically and emotionally. Although I have a degree in fine arts and a printmaking studio, printmaking for me is a somewhat emotionally dark process, and I felt I needed something that would help me find the joy in life again.
As a weaver, I am self-taught as far as not having had a tutor with me physically; however I consider research my teacher, as it has enabled me to learn from some of the greatest weavers in history.

 

Artist Statement

The nature of horses makes for fascinating study – immensely strong and powerful, yet soft as a whisper….